Is There More to Perimeter Security than Video? – Part 2

It’s been nearly a year since we posted comparing sensor-based perimeter security to video-based outdoor intrusion detection systems. Has anything changed?

The security market is video-centric. We get it – CCTV is an excellent tool, and it keeps getting better. Every year hundreds of firms plow millions of dollars into CCTV R & D, and millions more are investing in mobile platforms such as drones and artificial intelligence and its integration with security systems. Video is arguably the most visceral security tool available, exceeding even “eyes on” assessment since systems are capable of collecting and displaying information we cannot see (think thermal or IR imaging).

If your system has been designed and installed right and everything’s working properly, video addresses the most important physical security questions: what happened, and when did it happen? With improved internet connectivity you now may have the means to remotely intervene when a crime is taking place. Under ideal circumstances and using high tech tools you may even identify a perpetrator.

Denning has sold over $200 million of physical security, communications, and network products* over the past four decades. We’ve done so with an appreciation for what tools such as CCTV, intrusion detection, communications, access control, and screening can do to mitigate an enterprise’s vulnerabilities.

There is a lot more to security than its physical tools. When we’re “in the moment” we start with the most basic security paradigm:

DETECT DELAY RESPOND

As we dig deeper we may apply Deter, Deny, Assess, Communicate, and Intervene to address a particular vulnerability. We do so understanding ASIS International ESRM (Enterprise Security Risk Management) models and tools.

There’s no substitute for a physical security risk assessment (RA) followed by a vulnerability assessment (VA). The RA outlines the threats, while a VA shows under what circumstances assets are at risk. The VA will also outline and perhaps quantify the potential impact.

If you’ve determined it’s people somewhere along an outside perimeter you’re looking for, consider the environment. Even the best lighted perimeters with low light/no light video technologies may be compromised if there’s blowing sand or snow, and/or fog. At a minimum you should be considering a layered “defense in depth” approach, with physical and electronic systems providing enhanced protection for the times when conditions are bad.

Testing cameras in an ice fog with air temperatures of -2 F.

As outside reps for leading industry manufacturers, we have field experience with scores of sensors and systems. It is with this insight that we repeat what we wrote last year: many of our clients once felt that video was their best line of outdoor perimeter defense. Video was chosen to tell them how something happened, and who did it. It takes one incident to tell them they need more than video alone can provide.

*Denning is a manufacturer’s middleman that sells to resellers, so these sales estimates reflect wholesale equipment costs less accessory components and installation.

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